Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA)

Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA)

Fundus Fluorescein angiography (FFA) is when your ophthalmologist uses a special camera to take pictures of your retina after injecting a dye in your blood. These pictures help your ophthalmologist get a better look at the blood vessels and other structures in the back of the eye.



WHY IS FFA PERFORMED?
FFA is often recommended to diagnose eye disease including:
  • Macular edema (swelling in the retina that distorts vision)
  • Diabetic Retinopathy (damaged or abnormal blood vessels in the eye caused by diabetes)
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Vein Occlusion - blockage of veins inside the eye
  • Ocular Tumors
  • Leakage in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSCR)
HOW IS FFA PERFORMED?
  • Your ophthalmologist will put drops in your eyes to dilate (widen) your pupil.
  • A yellowish coloured dye (fluorescein) is injected in your arm. It takes about 10–15 seconds for the dye to travel throughout your body and reach the blood vessels in your eye.
  • As the dye passes through your retina, a special camera takes pictures
ANY SIDE EFFECTS?
  • Mild nausea, vomiting
  • Itching at injection site
  • Your skin may look a bit yellow for a few hours
  • Your urine may look orange or dark yellow for up to 24 hours afterwards. (kidneys filter the dye)

Expert Doctors

Dr. Vinay Garodia

Founder Director

MBBS (AIIMS), MD (AIIMS, Gold Medalist) DNB,
MNAMS, FRCS (Eng)

Vitreoretina, Cataract and Refractive